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AG永久入口💰【ag88.shop】💰真人金花COVID-19【: World ec\o\no/my in 2020 \to suffer \worst year since 1930s G/【reat \Dep】res】s【ion, says IMF【“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207The climat【e em】erg】e/ncy is 】no】t th/e【 only\ en【viron\】me【ntal issu\e th\e world【 i】s strug\/\gli】ng to solve. Plastic \products clog our ocean/s, /thre】atening /marine /life and poll【uting the water. At current rates plastic】 is predicted to outweigh all the f\ish in t/h】e sea by the \year 2050. In Holla/nd, a new device 【is a sm\all si】gn of 】hope.】 \'WasteSha/【rk' is a remotely /contro\lled device that 】co【llects rubbish 】from the water.Th】is m/ini-catamaran has been developed to remo【ve plastics and ot/h【er fl】oating debris from\ 【the sur\face of l【akes a【nd oceans/. Its sensors c【an moni/【tor pol】luti【on】 le\【v【el/】s a【n】d】 other environmental ind/icators. It 】is e/lectrically powered, emissio/n-free a】nd can collect hundreds of \kilos o\f rubbish at a /time. Ric/hard Hardiman is the \founder of Ranmarine Technologies, the comp\any responsible fo【r Waste Shark:"What【 we're tryi】/ng to do is cre/\ate a small enough vesse】l that will g【et into tight spac\es where wa/ste c】ol】lects, particularly in the harbours and the port【s,\ and s【top all that waste being take/n out in】to the grea/】ter ocean."I have】 a visio】n in 【my head that /keeps me 】going, that is】 you'd be sit\ting in a/ control room from our\ site 】we could se\e where /eve【ry drone is across/ the p】lane【t, how many\ \are o【perating, how much wast/e is being ca】ught and actually see the real im【pac\t of that these things are\ making a\round the world."\T/his is one of the 】proje\cts that receive/d su】pport from th】】e European funds allocated to】 making plas【t】ic circular. R【anmari/ne 【/is a\ Dutch startup \company and has already g\ot 【cust/o】m/ers】 in several countries. Tessa Despinic is its design en\gineer:"The basi\c function of /t/he】 WasteShark is very simple.【 【It just swims aroun】d and collects tra/sh f/rom the su/rface. 【But inside, it's always chan】ging, we're always try/ing to make 【it light【er, more efficie】nt/, easier to do mainten/a\nce on. And we【're also buil】ding \an autonomous v/ersion that w/ill s】wim a】round accord【ing\ to/ w【】aypoints /that y\ou give】【 it. So we're alw【ays wo/rking o\n that 【and /making】 it better/."Th/e Eu/ropean Union is l】eading the global fight against marine lit】ter. Besides its/ policies curbing single\-us\e plas/】tic【s and r\ed\ucing waste from l/ost\ fishing gear/, the EU ha】s earmarked 】350/ million Euro \【for research a\n/d de】velopment in this area.Watch Good /M/orni【n】g E\urope's report i\n the player\ ab/ove.J\ournalist/ \na\me • Joao Vitor【 Da Silva MarquesVideo editor • Joa】o Vitor Da Silva Marques】/Sha】re this \art\icleCopy/pas\te t/he a\rt/icle\ vi】deo embed link below:CopyShareTwe\etSharesendS/hareTw】ee】tSha\resen】dMoreHide/S【har/eSendShareShar\eShareSen【dS/hareSh【areYou might also like \ 】 C【OP25: C\hile summit/ withdrawa\l /hits tourism \b】/【u【t \opens new door fo\r environment\ a\ctivists / 】 /\ \ 【 / Is Blac/k Friday bad for/ the environment? Activists take on\ 【sh/opping【 fr【enzy 】 】 / C【ol】dplay to /pause touring, cit【ing environmental reasons / More aboutclima【te】 chang\ecli【】】】mate protectio/nClimate emergen【cyClim/a\te crisisEnvironm\ent polluti/onEn/vironmental】【】 protectionHot TopicLearn more about 】 climate chang】e Hot 【TopicLearn more about climat【e change \ Browse today's tags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/es\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tagsHow smal/l scale fisher【ies sa】ved/ Danish f\ishing c\ommunitiesA fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | ViewHow/ is the【 UAE ta】ckling its food waste problem?【,见下图

】One of Europe&r\squ【o;s biggest music festivals ha/s take\n its eco-c/reden/tials to the ne】xt l\】evel this summer, with r\eusable pape】r t\e/nts, reu\sable /c\u【ps a\nd e】ven water-saving toilet\s.Sziget festival /on Haj\】ógy&a/a\cute;ri】 Is【land, B【udape\/st, Hungary, kicked off on Wednesday, with【 a raft 】o\f en/vir/onmen\tally-friend\ly impr/ovements, and a focus on the climate.\As we\ll as all the music and partying, the UN Messenger of Peac\e Dr 】Jane Goodall w【il【l be just 】one of the\ speakers promot/ing the imp【ortance o/f pr\otecting the \env\i\ronment at/\ the ne\a】rly week-long fes/tival.&l【dqu\o/;Last】 year we could replace one and a/ half million single-use glasse【s wit/【h a few hundred /】th\ousand of re【u【sable glasses,” said Ákos Dominus, 】project manager of the Green Is【land【 project.“This yea\r\, the Sziget festi/val will 】consume million plastic glasses less, and the number is rising/ ev】ery【 year. So we can see how】 sustain】able this \program is.&r】dquo;On 】Sziget’s l【ast day/, tents, sleepi】ng bags, and mats\ that have been left】 behind will 】be co【llected by cha【rity organizati\ons.Share this a【/rticleC/opy/paste the article vid/【eo embed lin/k be【low:Cop/yShareTweetShar/esendSha【reTweetS】haresendMore/HideShareSen】dShareSha\/reShareSendS\hareShareYou【【 might al】so l】ike 】 S【\zi\get fest】iv/al atte】ndee/s defend Coca C】o/la's #LoveIsLove campaign in Hu/ngary / 【 【 / Hunga】rian/s say 【goodb/ye /】to winter with bizarre and scary c\ostume festiv】a【l 【 【 \ Ras Al/ Khaimah \Fine Arts Festi\val spo】tlights Emira\t\i &/; int/ernational \talent 】 / More】 ab\outSziget【 festi】val】FestivalEnvi/ronmental prot/ection / B【ro】wse today�/39;】s tags

In a move designed to kickstart what CE【O Ma】rio Di Mauro desc】ribes as &ldq\uo;a ne】w digital game&rdquo【;, internatio【nal service prov/ider Sparkle】 laid a sy【mbolic 【fo\undation /stone 】for the comp/any&rs【quo;s lates【t data centre on 21 Ja\nuary\. Situate/d j】ust 】o/utside Athens, \/th/e 【new site will hou】se Sparkle’s fourth d【ata centre i【n Greece, and【 \forms part of a【n /ongoing\ strateg【y 】to invest in t】he country【.Metamorfosis\ II will /incorporate the/ lates【t environme/ntally fr【ie】ndly technology, and wi\ll offer over 6,】/00】0m2 of data co-location space, 】allowing 】for the expansion o【f a client b\ase that cur】rently include】s serv/ice pro/viders, syste【\m in/tegrators, local a【nd i】nt【ernation/al bu/sinesse】/s, content providers, instit/utions and OTT media services.A key play/er in /\the\ global 】telec/oms marketAs the international a】rm of Italian telecommunications giant TIM, 】Sparkl\e has a 】prese【nce in 3 countries, with a proprietar】y \backbone of/ around 53【0,000 ki【\lo】metres of fibre optics【 a/cross four c【o/ntinents. It offers a wi【de range of/ IP, data, cloud/ and 【voi/c/e servic【es to customers, ensur【ing excep】tion\al se/\curit【y 【and relia】bility.The/ f【\ocus 【for it【s data centre/s is Europe, an】d specific/ally the Medit\erranean area. Spar】kle has【 been 】operating in Greece since 2001, and already has one data c/】entre】 in Cre【te and two m】ore just outsid/e【 Athens/.Th/ese have a com\bined space of 8,000m2, but the n/ew【 Meta/【morfosi\s II wil/l add to this capa/cit\y wi【th /clos【e to 6,000m2 】of add\itional /c\o-loca\tion sp\ace. As with the company’s】 existing cen】/tres 】in Greece, Metamo【\rfosis\ 【II will b【e】 fully integrated in Nib\ble, the /new pan-Med/i【terranea【n photonic network, and i】\n Seabone, Sparkle】's IP/MPLS internet back/bon/【e, providing high-performance services and indu】s\try-benchmark s】pe】eds.Environmental su】stainability as stra【tegi/c priorityPlans for /the co/nst】ruction \of the new com/plex put envir【onmental concerns fron【【【【t and centre. &ld/quo;The new /European Com】mission has ma【de sustainability the\ \key iss\ue 】in the fut\ure】 policy of Europe,”【 say】/s Salvatore Rossi, chairman of TIM. &l【d\q\uo;E【very private compan】y acting in 】the m/arket has to understand that this 】is a business opportunity, no\t a cost.\&】rdquo;\Sparkle’s\ commi【tment to environmental sust】\ainability\ is not】hi】n】g new, a【nd\ its business operations】 were the first 】of their kind in Greece /to be awarded with\ the ISO 14001:2015/】 certifi【cation, wh【ich recog\n】ise】s the company’s e】nvironmental-pr】otection/ me\asures.【S】parkl【/e&/rsquo;s Is\tanbul d\a/【ta 】centre is h】eld to be someth/【ing of a blue\print in /the ind】ustry, and a re\cent expansion and renovation 】saw th\e addition 】of state-o】f-t\he-art te【chno/logy【】 【that enabled the company to increase c【ap【acity b】y 40 p】ercent /\while reducing\ consump】tio/n by 14 pe\rcent.A key factor was the introduction of lithium-ion /(Li-ion) batteries, an innovatio】n that will also play a role in th/e Metam\orfo【si\s II /cent/r\e, along with the latest en【ergy-efficien/t light, /】/power and cooli【ng systems. Thes/e will jointly allow a carbon-footprin/t reduction o\f around 28,000 ton】s a year, or【 】/– i/n simpler ter【ms &nd】ash/; 】will require close to half the energy req/uired to run a \regular data centre of comparable size and capaci【t\y.Reco】gnising local potentialBut 】technolog/y is onl【/y half the pi】cture. For five years in【 a row 【Sparkle has won Infocom awards that acknow】ledge the /com【pany&rs/quo;【s success in the cloud and data indus】tries,/ as well as its/ contribution to the d【e/velopm【/ent 】o】\f t】he Greek m】arke】t/ overall.\As t/he green shoots of recovery emerge fro】m Gr\eece&rs【quo;【s lo【ng per\i/od of s/tagnation and aus】】terity, Sparkle se\es boun\dless possibiliti【es in the region. “For us, it&rsquo/;s】 ver/y important to develop our】 activities in the 【centre of the Mediterranean area,” says Alessa【\ndro Pa\】nsa, cha【i【rman of S】parkle. “】We want to extend ou/r activities in Asia,\ i【n Africa, in 【\ot/her parts of】 the wor\ld, but 】Athens\ will be t】he focal point 【for ou【【r next /a】ctivity./【”The ques\t】i【on is not 【merely one o】f】 /e【conomics. Mario 】Di Mauro is ke/en 【to leverage the vast pot/\ential he se\/es in the country/’s human capital. &ldq】uo;We have \here/ p\eople\ who are cap\】abl\e of pla/ying this inn】o】vation 【role, and these people a【re /impo【\【rt【ant.&r\dquo;Laying】 o\ut his】 】vis【ion f】or the future, Di】 Mauro predicts that th】【is i】nvestment \in Greece and its workforce will not only b】en【】efit the company’s operatio/ns wit/hin the country, but t/hat he hopes to “\】【c】】apit/al/i【se on al】l this k】nowledge /for all 】the global operation【s of Sparkle.”Share this】 articleCopy/past/e the article video embed link \be【low:CopyShar/eTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreH\ideShareSendShareShareShar】eSendShareShareMo\【re abo/utTelecommun【ic【ation\Techno【log【yBig Da\taI【nvestmentEnvironmental protection / \ Browse【 today&【#039【;】s tagsCreating music f【rom garbageDeep sea explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau 【teaches UAE childr\en abou\/t \ocean c/o】nse\rva/tionWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】steText sizeAaAaThe d/ebate arou\nd the sustainability of le\a【ther p\rodu】ction is g【ai/ning m【omentum in th【】e fashion/【 industry. In 】recent y【ears, ra/ising awareness around the\ ecological impact o】f producin/g le】athe】r i/tems】 has prompt\ed a gro【w】】ing number of brands to rec\onside】r their u【se of the fa【bri】c in】 th】e/ir fashio【n lines/, as well as it has【 pushe/d new actors to \co】me up w\ith innovative solutions to creat\e more ecol【og\ically-【fr/】iendly le\ather/.The ec】ologica【l cost of leather productio】nT/he initial r】aw\ material for l\eather 【producti】/on is animal【 skin\ which orig【inates from ani】mal farming, a pro】ce\ss w\h【ich】 【usually rel】ie【s on huge amounts of feed, pasturel/and【, water, and】 fossil fuels with ne/gative ecologic\al impacts. However, leathe【r /is 】on】l】y a by-pro/duct in thi】s process, the animals being primarily raised for their me\【at/.Where/ the e【nvir【onmental cos/t of leat】her product\io\n really beco】mes visibl【e is at the /stage of the\ transformatio【n of the animal skin into the f】inal prod/uct. Since /leather is a perishable material, a number 】of methods have been used to st【abi【//lise t\【he raw mate【ri\al, and make it m\ore durable via t/h【e tanning process.This 】】is an indus【trial process that【 typically involves 【many ch\e】mical com】pounds and uses up a lot of water and energy. A number of hazardous mat\eri/】als a\nd /p】ollutants are/ releas\ed i】n 】the envir【onmen【t s\uch 【as mineral salts, lime slud】ge, sulfides, fo\rmaldeh\yd\e, coal-tar de/ri【vatives, a】nd various oil【s, dyes, and finishes (some o/f them cyani【de-bas【ed) are employed. . Water \i】s u【sed in】 high quantit】【y as a s/olvent, which is all the more problematic that a significa【nt n【umbe\r of tan【neries/ are lo【cate】\d in ar\id regions \of the world.To a】ddress these i【ssues, \the dev\elopment of new technologies t【o\ 】provide】 more ef【fici\ent processes for【 the pr\oduction of le】ather【 is under】way. So are efforts to promote the production of synth】etic leath\e\r, /w/hi】c/h could offer an interes【ting【】 alternative to th【e fas/hi【on indu【stry.Cow lea】\ther vs synthetic leatherFor 】change 】to happe】n in the leather i/ndustry tho】ugh, rob/ust assessme/nts of t\he/ dif/feren】t m】ethods us\ed in the ta【nn】ing process/ and compari\sons betw【ee\n cow lea】ther an\d other materi】als, are ne【ed\ed.Researchers have assessed the e【cological impact of different ta【nning methods to se【e if on【e was prefe】rable in t【】erms of its environment/al footprint.】 One o】f the techniques 【that some tanneries \employ to reduce the u【se\ of harmful che】micals is to 】resort to vege/table-tann【i【ng.This is an artisanal process that tak/【es advantage of /the t】an【ni\c acids na【】turally found i/】【】n some pl\】ants, by using the/ barks, branches,】 lea【ves or even s】\ome fruits in s/ome specific te\chniques. 【It is /【t\houg【ht to be more 【environmental/ly friendly than oth/e/r methods of processing /cow l\eather.To find out more,/ a 2017 stu【dy comp【a\r/ed this 【m【eth/o/d to more t\radit\ional 【methods using chemi】\cals suc\h a【\【s c/hromium-】/tanning, looking at th\e carbon, water, and energy 【footprint o\f the vege】\table】 】and chromium leather pro】ces/sing 】technology in 12 selecte/d tanneries in seven dif/ferent coun】/tries worldwide.The scientists act【【u】a【lly fo【und no sign/if【ican】t d\iff【erences in the fo【otpr【int of vegetabl/】e 】and chromium leather processes. Ho【wever, they cauti】on that this type of research is /challenging to do and /that tak/i】ng steps to improve the leather ind/ustry need to be base\d\ on evidence\-based resea\r【ch.“\Each tannery proved to be 【very individual, a\nd the\refore 】att【empting to pe/rform this type of analysis /without si【mply producin/g【 meaningle【ss generalities is 【a cha\llenge\ f【or companies, researcher\s, and regulator/s,&r】dquo; the 】researchers say. While【 /there is/\ little evide\nce \then that cho】osing a spec\ific m【ethod of leather tanning may be 【bette\r fo【】r the environment, \the evidence in favour of producing syntheti\c lea\ther ins】tead of leat】【her from /an\imals i\s mounting.Th】e 201】【 Pulse of T【he 】Fash/ion Industry Report published by the Global】 Fashion Agenda and The Bos/ton Con/\s】ult【ing Grou/p, was instrumental in highlig【ht【ing the\ idea that the prod】uctio/n/ of 】synthetic leather i\s less d】amaging /to the \environment/. It offer/ed 【some \of th【e most robus【t 】conclusions 【o】n th/e subject to date,】 p【ro】mpting\ 【stake】holders in the】 fashion indus/t\ry to switch to more ecological options, including synthetic leat【he】r【.Th】e /rep】o【rt indee\d/ showed \that among /all the materia】ls used in the fashion \ind】ustry, an】imal leather ranked thi【rd as the main contributor to global\/ warmi\ng. I【t also came first as the 【most damaging mat【erial/ when resea\rchers looked 【at th\】e issue of eutrophicat【】ion : its man【ufa】ctu【re was【 associated w】ith a relea/se of excessive chemical compounds and nu/trients/ into bodi【es of w】ater, frequently due to runoff from】 th【e land, causing\ dense growth of plant l\if【e\ and deat\/h /of 】anima【l\ life from lack of 【oxygen.More impor】tantl【y, the report found that synthetic leather /had on average on】ly /【a third of the environme】n】tal \impact of【【 cow leather. 】Switching to/ alternative materi】\【/a\/ls, including synthetic leather【, could thus directl\y improve a p\roduct&rs【quo;s 】ecological foot/prin】t.Gro】wing number of initiativesThe \mes【s【age【 has progressively\ been recei\ved\ and a growing numbe\r of initiatives i/llustrat】e the mo/ve to abandon cow l】eath】er for its synt】hetic a【lternatives. Exa\mples of a\dva/nces rely o【n the development a】nd the us【e of non/-convent/iona/【l fib/e\rs made fr【om substances /su【ch as c/itrus/ juice, grape 】plan/ts, or kelp, bioengin/eered \/leather, and the furt】her【 /promotion of bast f【ibers.In its m】】o/st re\ce/nt 2018 edition, the Pulse of Th【e Fashion In/dustry Report presen【te\d a num\ber of projects carri/ed by companies dedicated to su\stainable fashion and t【o pro/ducing synthetic【 le【at【her at the lowest ecological c/ost.Mi\lan-based compa【ny Vegea \is fo\r in【stance working to crea【te leather that is 】m/a【de entirely fr【o【m【】 grapes skin, stalks, an\d seeds and for th/is, it【 won th【e 20】17 H&M Global Change Award. Another good e\xa【【mple is the company known 【a】s 【Provenance Biofabrics which pr】oduces b】ioengineere【d leather【 by pr】ogramming /collagen molec】ules to self-assem\ble.These are 】just some of the initiative【s/ under d\eve【lopment, \and the f/i】eld is now undergoing a period of inno】】va【】tion and dynamism】. /Exactly】 what 2019 will bring is 【uncle【ar】, \b【ut one thing is cer【tain\ : the leather industry 【is/\ profoundly changing to b/ecome more sustainable.Writer: L\éa Su【rugueShare th】is article 【 】 More from styleDo e【nvironmental documentaries actually have an impac【t on p【eople’s bad】 ha/bits?,如下图

Text sizeAaAaMagda【le\na【 Herrera, director of pho】\tog/raphy at】 G/EO】 magazine, has a 【weal】th of exper【ienc【e in t\【he wor\ld o\/f photography and journalism, an/d a keen eye for an am【\azin\g image. /This made h/e/r id【eally place【d for her a【ppoin/tment as a judge for】\ th【e 2019 Eu\r【op】ean Wildlife Photographer o】f the Y\ear】./The competition, run annually b\y the So】ciety of German Nature Photographers and now\】 in its 19th year, challenges profession\al and no/n【-professional photo【graphers】 alike to 【provide th】e bes/t photograp/hy Europe has to offer/.Herrera too【k/ some time【 to talk t\o us ab】out the com/petition, what to exp】ec/t,【 and how photographers, a【s well as providin\g b\reathta【【kin【g image\s,】 can help drive positive engage\ment w//【ith t\he envir】onment.【Congratu\/lation】s on your ap【po】intment\ to t\he judging pa\nel for the GDT European Nature photographer of t】he Year 2019. How did you beco】me involved wit【h th】】is 【\co\mpe】tition】?&ldqu\o;I t】】hin/k some of the p】hotographers I wo/r/k\ with\ at Geo ha/ve】 s【uggest【ed that I partic】ipa】te. Geo is a magazine that 【is concer】ned with the 【en/vir/onment, nature /a【nd\ wildlife con【serva\tion.&rdquo\;Salvad】or Colvee【, Nebot Der/ Tanz 】D【es Okt【o【pus】W】hy 】do 】yo\u thin/k competitions such/ as this a\re i】mportant?“N】/【a】tu\re a】nd wildlife ph【otography is becoming increasingly po\pular. P【ho【tographers 【are our am/bassador\s an\d our eyes an\d these e】vents allow u】s 【to make the object of t【heir w/o/rk known/ to the widest possible 【au\dience. Tod/ay, it i】s/ important to highligh【t the natural beauty o/f o【ur pl/anet but /also t】/he dang\ers. /It/'s not just about beautifu\l p\ic/【ture】s.”H】ave you seen /many of the entries 】yet? What i/s the standard lik】e so far?“As far as I【 can se】e the standard is high!”Is】 there an【ything in particular you’】r【e hoping to s/ee in this year’s 【entri/es?“I hope /】to see, as wit\h any photo, something that sho/ws com/plexity or tension, behaviour, activity a\nd threat too.&rdqu/o;Is there a cat【egory that you particula\rly appreciat\e or enjoy?“I have to say, I love all of the】m\ \but I am 】part【icularly intere】sted in the 】K7 \one (the one that focuses o】n the beneficial or】 n【\egative rel【ationsh】ip /bet【ween humans /and nature).【Cristobal【 Serran\o, Der PoolWhy do/ you /th【i/nk it is \important 】for the competition to exp【lore this particul【ar topic?“It is important not t【o separate /the animal fro\m the human and to sh/ow th【【is relations】hi】p, which\ can /be de】structive (o\n\ the part of humans). W【e share a p【lanet where everyone must find t【heir 【place.&rdqu【o;To what ex/tent is nature photo\graphy a\ble to re/flect on the【 efforts of c\onservation 】a】nd/or reveal\ what/ more nee【ds to be done?】 Wha/t【 are its limi\ta】tions?“Nature photogr\ap/hy sho/ws us 【an ov【e】rview of the situati【on, s】/ometimes in a very aesthetic form, but in recent【 years/ it has evolved 【into\ a photography t\hat r/evea】ls【 a context \that, 【like any】 documen/tary photography, explores th】e re/lations/hip of the living to a territ//ory. In this se】nse/, it s】trongly【 concerns us all.”/W/ords: Dan【ny \McCanceHeader: Joel Brunet, Ein /Gemaelde d【es LebensShare this artic\le 【 More fr【om places\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】change

How to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】e

如下图

风电T/witte【r react【s to police ba\n o/n E\xtinction 】Rebellion pro【tes\ts in Lond/onText sizeAaAaMagda【le\na【 Herrera, director of pho】\tog/raphy at】 G/EO】 magazine, has a 【weal】th of exper【ienc【e in t\【he wor\ld o\/f photography and journalism, an/d a keen eye for an am【\azin\g image. /This made h/e/r id【eally place【d for her a【ppoin/tment as a judge for】\ th【e 2019 Eu\r【op】ean Wildlife Photographer o】f the Y\ear】./The competition, run annually b\y the So】ciety of German Nature Photographers and now\】 in its 19th year, challenges profession\al and no/n【-professional photo【graphers】 alike to 【provide th】e bes/t photograp/hy Europe has to offer/.Herrera too【k/ some time【 to talk t\o us ab】out the com/petition, what to exp】ec/t,【 and how photographers, a【s well as providin\g b\reathta【【kin【g image\s,】 can help drive positive engage\ment w//【ith t\he envir】onment.【Congratu\/lation】s on your ap【po】intment\ to t\he judging pa\nel for the GDT European Nature photographer of t】he Year 2019. How did you beco】me involved wit【h th】】is 【\co\mpe】tition】?&ldqu\o;I t】】hin/k some of the p】hotographers I wo/r/k\ with\ at Geo ha/ve】 s【uggest【ed that I partic】ipa】te. Geo is a magazine that 【is concer】ned with the 【en/vir/onment, nature /a【nd\ wildlife con【serva\tion.&rdquo\;Salvad】or Colvee【, Nebot Der/ Tanz 】D【es Okt【o【pus】W】hy 】do 】yo\u thin/k competitions such/ as this a\re i】mportant?“N】/【a】tu\re a】nd wildlife ph【otography is becoming increasingly po\pular. P【ho【tographers 【are our am/bassador\s an\d our eyes an\d these e】vents allow u】s 【to make the object of t【heir w/o/rk known/ to the widest possible 【au\dience. Tod/ay, it i】s/ important to highligh【t the natural beauty o/f o【ur pl/anet but /also t】/he dang\ers. /It/'s not just about beautifu\l p\ic/【ture】s.”H】ave you seen /many of the entries 】yet? What i/s the standard lik】e so far?“As far as I【 can se】e the standard is high!”Is】 there an【ything in particular you’】r【e hoping to s/ee in this year’s 【entri/es?“I hope /】to see, as wit\h any photo, something that sho/ws com/plexity or tension, behaviour, activity a\nd threat too.&rdqu/o;Is there a cat【egory that you particula\rly appreciat\e or enjoy?“I have to say, I love all of the】m\ \but I am 】part【icularly intere】sted in the 】K7 \one (the one that focuses o】n the beneficial or】 n【\egative rel【ationsh】ip /bet【ween humans /and nature).【Cristobal【 Serran\o, Der PoolWhy do/ you /th【i/nk it is \important 】for the competition to exp【lore this particul【ar topic?“It is important not t【o separate /the animal fro\m the human and to sh/ow th【【is relations】hi】p, which\ can /be de】structive (o\n\ the part of humans). W【e share a p【lanet where everyone must find t【heir 【place.&rdqu【o;To what ex/tent is nature photo\graphy a\ble to re/flect on the【 efforts of c\onservation 】a】nd/or reveal\ what/ more nee【ds to be done?】 Wha/t【 are its limi\ta】tions?“Nature photogr\ap/hy sho/ws us 【an ov【e】rview of the situati【on, s】/ometimes in a very aesthetic form, but in recent【 years/ it has evolved 【into\ a photography t\hat r/evea】ls【 a context \that, 【like any】 documen/tary photography, explores th】e re/lations/hip of the living to a territ//ory. In this se】nse/, it s】trongly【 concerns us all.”/W/ords: Dan【ny \McCanceHeader: Joel Brunet, Ein /Gemaelde d【es LebensShare this artic\le 【 More fr【om placesWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】steA fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | View

More than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ group

Scienti【st】s es【ti【mate that roughly 】on/e million la\n/d and\ marin【e species may】 bec【ome extinct in the foreseeab/le f\uture. Many within】 decades. What are the main【 reasons for th/e decl\ine\ of under/water ec\osystems?Thanos Dailianis, a marine\ biologist fr】om the\// HCM【R-IMBB\C /resea【rc【h instit/ute /【in【 Crete,/ exp\la/\i】ns.“Marine ecosyste】ms are threatened bo/th locally 】\an【d globally/. At the lo\cal l】【evel, the/ coastal zo】ne hosts】 a lot of 【human activities, 】/ i\mp】】o\rt\ant human activities, like 】urban【isation, like agricu\lture, industry of】 co/urse, and【 ot\her uses which cause loc【a\lise/d fo】rms of degradation, l【ike pollutio/n,/ l】et’s s\ay.""But on the other hand, we have la\rge-sca\【le ph】enomena, like global warming/, or ocea/n a\cidificat/ion, which【【 \of course jo】in toge/the】r with the local】 pre\ssures and【 cause/ sometimes uncontrolled ef【/fects【.""In Crete, 】we’/re located in t/he Eastern/ Mediterranean which】/ ri\ght now【 i/s the warmest place in the Mediterranean/ basin.\ This【, a/】lon/【gsid\e with】 the adjacency with /the S\u【ez Cana【l, makes \it】 very sus\ce】pti【ble to ch【an/g【e right now.""So what we see here is an// early w】arning o/f 】things that will probably spread/ 】towards【 the 】west】 of the Mediterranean /in the\ fo\】rthcoming\ years.""/And【 of cour\se, these t【hings also happen at the global level. Global w/armin/g is a global t/hr【eat, of course, and species coming fr【/om other parts /of \th/e world is【 a universal trend right now becaus【e of this ong/oing c/hang/e.""We are of c【ourse c/oncerned because we feel it is our duty to preserve t/his biodiversity for future generations, an/d we feel t【hat righ【/t now it/’s on the ve\rge of be】coming de\g\r\ade\d.""Nature finds its ways, and t【/his 】ri/ch/ness will/ be replaced by \another richness. /The】 problem is\ mainly for us because we ha】v【e built our 【lives \with this biodive/rsity, so the loss of t/his biodiversity 【will /ma/inly af/【】f\ect hum【【ans as a species.""T】he \service\s it provides to us,/ the food, the 】\environment; all the】 stuff that makes】 our【 life nice \t【o live.\&/rdquo;Share this art】icle\【Copy】/paste the article video\ embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShare】SendS】hareShareShareSendShareS】hareYo【u /might a\lso like 】 】 】 What’s k/illing】 our \unde【rw/ater ecosystems? 】 【 】 】 / 】 】 Uncharted wate】rs: how maps ca/n help prevent conf\lict o【v/er /marine resources 】 / 【 \ 【 【 \ \ Famil】y-run fisheries struggle as n/ew generation casts net wider 】 【 More a】boutOceanFauna and Flor【aEn\vironment/【al prot【\ectionbiodiversityGree【ce 】 Mo】st viewed \ \Wh】at influ/ence on climate i\s the corona\virus lockdown rea\lly【 having? \ 【 【 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from infec】tion 【 Me/ssenger RNA: th【e mol【ecul/e that \may teach \our bodies to b【e/at cancer 【 \ 【 Apple and Go\ogle 【say they'll work toge/th【er to trace spr\e\ad of coronavirus\ \via smart\p\hones / How EU】 funding is changi\ng 【【the face of La\tvian innova】ti\on \ 】 Browse today�/39;s tags

1.真人金花

Life under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tagsCreating music f【rom garbageThis episode of【 Inspire /Afr/ica features 】a non-government【al organisation 】in t\he Republic】 of Congo, /which has embarked on a mi\【ssi【on of su\pportin】g rural \commu【nit/ie【s an\】d 【empowering them to】 contribute to the protection of /the count】ry’s bi\odivers【\ity. We】 also tak】e a tour\ \t】hrough Nigeria【\ /w\here wom\en /are revolutioni【sing/】 the world of f/i】ne arts.Share \this articleC\opy/pa\ste the article【】 video embed\ link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShare\TweetSharesendMoreHideS【h】areSendShareShareS\/h\areSendShare\ShareYou might 】】also l\ike 【】 【 】 】 F/ire】\ engulfs market in N【igeria's commercial capital L/agos 】 【 \ 【 At least 65 kille/d in Nigeria Boko Haram attac/k - state TV \ 【 / 】 / \// If the EU won'/;t stop the s】low murd\er of "N/ige/ria&】#039;s G/a/ndhi", perhap【s Bri/tain\ can/ ǀ View 】 / 】 \ More aboutNig【【eri\aRepubl】i】c of CongoArtEnvironmental p\rotectionWomen Browse today's tagsT【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【lacesIt【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tags

2.真人金花。

In a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600What if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tags fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tagsText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from life“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Tourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert region 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsThis expo \is unit/ing designers wit【h【 thou【sands of responsibl【y \source\d materials 】Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000【Text si/zeAaAaOnce upon a time, there were th/ree bro\thers\...the story o/f the second/ best rest【au/rant i【n【 the w【orld, called El Cell\er de 【Can\ Roca, 【could 【start like a fable but thi\s story i\s actually real【. The Roc】a brothers' 【passion f【or co/ok\i\ng led them to open their 【restaurant in 1986\ and it has received thr【e【e Michelin-stars since then.Thei】r commitment is【 not limited to \cuisine, th【e restaur】ant operates【 a zero-w【ast】e【 p/olicy. Celle】r de C\an Roca&rsq【uo;s】 philo/so/phy consists in enhan/cing the loc】al【 products a】nd favouring sustainabi\lity.Ea/rl【ier /this year the restau/ran\t got int\o t\he spotlight bec】ause of finding 【a\ c/reative way t【/o make a good use\ of their 【plastic; they hav】e teamed up with Span/ish des】igner Andreu Carul\la, who \transformed t\】he p/la】stic waste of the/ restaurant into hex\ago】nal stools.And now the three brother】s 【have found 【another /way to \r【ecycle 【/some /of the res】t/aurant's【 waste, a project/ called Roca Rec【icla】.Click on the video\ 【above to learn more about /th/i】s restaurant's initiative t\o raise en【vironmental awareness.Share thi\s artic【le / \ Mo】re from wellness twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife

3.真人金花。

/Cavi【ar/ with c/ompassion is set to revolutionize\ the 】d/elicacy】/Agriculture i【s facing a/ hi【storical challenge. In the next 3】0【 【ye【ars, food /demand will【 increa】se\ by 70 %.Facing this, it /will be necessary to i【ncrease an【d/ improv【e /production, /but al\/so】【 to lim】】it its impact on the env/ironment.Research/ers at Bio Sense institute, in Novi Sad, Serbia ar\e connecting sta【te-of-the-art technologies to crops to /cha【nge the productive model.Their mantra: "we c/annot feed\ today's world wit】h yes【ter//day 【agriculture".\And that is al/so】 the driving force behind t/he An【tares European project, which has developed a centre for ad/vanced technologies a【nd sustainable agric】ulture in this Se】rbian city located alongside the Danube.The【 Research/ Institute fo【r/ Information Technologies in】 Biosystems/ is part 】o【\f a Euro\pean funded programme to wide\n the participati/o】n of\ memb【er states and/ associated countr/i/【es who are lag【ging behind/ in /terms of res】earch and innovation.The Digit\al FarmAgriculture of the 【futu【re wil/l use 】advanced】 technologies, such as s/e【nsors, robots, drones, big data and sa】t\ellit】e/ ima/g/er/y."With a growing popul【a】tion, we need \to produce in t】【he/ next 40 years as much fo【od as we did in the pa】st 1/0000 years to\ do /that\," explai/ns Antar【es project coord】in/ator/ and electro\nics engi【ne】er, Vesna Bengin."We n【e\ed 【sensors a\nd senso】rs and some more sensors and some artific】ial intelligence on top of t【hat....to make our culture m【ore efficie\nt."Micro and nanoel】ectroni】cs de【\v/ices ena/ble farmers to c【heck th】e general s\ituation of the crops an】d sp/ot 【potential diseases at/ very early stages."Soil sensors will give 【you \the in\formation w/hen\ to irriga/t/\e and th/en not so you can diminish t\he amount of water tha\t】 is used for the ir】rigation \pro【cess," says 】Goran Kitić,/ the head of the nano-mic【ro-elec\tr】onics/ laboratory at the Biosense institute./"B】\ut/\ also we\'【re developing som\e sort of s【olutions that tell you how much of the food【 for /the plant is i/n the so\il h\ow muc【h nitrogen is in/ disarray."Several 'Digital Farm' pilot projects have alread/y been la】/\un/ched in Serbia."Digital【 agri【culture 】is t/he agric/ulture based on heavy u/s/e of d\ata\ so tha【t we are trying to 】colle/ct d】a】ta【/【 in opp【ortunis】tical【ly 【fr/om【 sensors,/ from 】the soil, fr\om plants, animals, sate/llites, drones you name it, in/ any p/ossible w】ay," e\xplain】s "d【irector of the Bi】o Se【n【se Instit【u/te,】 Vladimir Crnojević."And then 【to】 u】se the l/a/test 】closure like artificial intelligence, bi】g\【 data concept to find \s/om\e h】idden kn/o【wledge that is not】 obvious."The 】Agrosen【se platf【ormThe virtual】 【counter\part of the Digital 】Fa/rm \is the Agrosense platform.This comprehens】iv/e/ database a【llows farmers to 【plan\ the/ir\ activit【i/es and bett/er m【onit\or crop conditions, d\ue to figu/res comin】g from different sources, such as robots,\ 】optical se/nso\rs, algo\rit【hms, meteorolog】ical st/a】tions an】d satellite data.\"T【h/e system we currently use can iden\ti\fy proble/ms o/n \】a l【eaf, a fruit o【r a vegetable, so we can react \earlier\ th\an \when we might detect it. When w】e【 realiz/e【 it,【 the p【lant is already si】ck, whi】le\ \the camera and t】he\ sensors can de【tect the 【beginning of the disea】se\, " says fa\rmer/,【 Djordje Dju\kic.Satel】lit】e images coming from Copernicus\ European Earth Observatio/n Progr\amme, along with drone thermal vie/ws and smartphone's photos pr【ovide f\ur【t】her in-dep】th inf【ormation about the biol】ogical paramete【rs\ of the /crop and\ t】he f\ield.F】armers c【an al\】so exchange data, send】 pictures,】 rec//eive information o【n how much fertili/zer to use to dispense o】r how to 】optimize irrigation, via sm【ar【tphone apps.Real-time anal【ysis of the \g】【/round properties can be deli\/\vered direct【\ly【 on-/s】ite \by a/ robot /mov】ing n 】a\utonomously through the field and sam】pling the soil.This allows designers to t/a\ilor-make/ the land ma\nagement sys\tem, even on small p\articl/es of the f】ield."This will【 give you the 】results in 1【0 minutes 】an/】d 】you will instantly /know what】'/s the /si】tua/tio】n li\ke, you \w】ill hav【e// a map and\ th/is /wil】l help the 】】farmer to【 be more efficient," sa】ys Goran/ Kitić, the head of nanomicroelectron/ics lab】or】atory at th\e Bios/ense ins/titu/te.The【 resurgenc\e of woodThe c\onst\ruct\ion sector worldwide is res】ponsibl【e for one\-third of al】l the CO2 emission【s and 40% of\ all the/ 】】wastes.Bu\【t sci【entists】 \be/lieve that wood can /ha\ve great】 potential as a carbon sink and offset o/f CO2 emissions. Woo【d has been o】ne of】 the mos\t /exploit\ed b【uilding ma\te\rials throughout history. Mode/rn time】s has s【ee】\n/ 】the 】dominatio\n of ste】el and concrete\, but wood 【is【 once 】again on \the rise.In【 \】Slovenia, the InnoRene【w【 CoE project, a/ r/esearch centre \】/of excell【ence has been crea\t/ed【 to/ deve【lop new b/uilding mat】erials based o【n wo】od and recyc\l/able na\tural prod】u/ct/s."T/imber constru】ctions, /as well 【as the search for new materials \based on natural products】, are ab/out to become more common."By combining c\hemi【str【y/ and com/puter science, material science, we can cr/e】at】e mat【erial that\ can be used in the building where the /people are f/eeling the p【\ositive impacts on the【ir percept】io\n tow【ards the livi/ng\ environment," sa【ys Andreja Kutnar, InnoR【enew CoE project /coordi】nato/r and /p】rofesso/r 】of wood science and tech【nology a】t t\he University of Primors】ka, Koper."/】it's \very sustainabl】e .\..because \when w】e cut/ the【 t\ree 【at the same tim】【e w/e pla\nt another one"Wood /】m\】odification/】 process【es also al】low desired proper】ties to be produ//ced by m\eans \of \【chemical, 】\biologica\l or phy【sica【l agents. And this can co】ntribute t/o re/ducing the envi】ro\nmental footprint and /economic cost【 o】f wood 【maintenance."Wood is basically the champi】on of all the r\enewab】le ma【terial. \】It's not only it's carbon neutral it's actually carbon negative. 【So basically when /you make a wooden house not only you【 d/idn't \r/ea\lly emit any CO2 we were actually s】toring】 it /in the【 construction /itself," says Iztok &Scaro/n;u&/scaron;ter&s/caro】n;i【69; , a research group le\ader at/ the Innorenew Cen\tre of 【Excellence (CoE).Architect/s】 are【 \also lookin\g with interes】t at【 wood【【 【as a we】ll-being solution. A topic of our interest is i\ts con/nection to t【he\ well-bein\g of p】eople. "How 【【buildin/gs can reduce stress. How it can improve health," says Eva \Prelov【&scar【on\;ek Ni\/em\el】ä, a\n【 a】rchitect at Innorenew CoE.Scientific evidence h\as\ confirmed the positiv/e /imp【act of wood in w/orkin】g and li【ving spaces.Michael Burnard,\ the de\puty di\rector of the Innorenew Centre of Ex\cellen】ce say【s "people tend to find t/\he material mo/re pleasant to th】e tou/c【h and nic】er to work】 with."Researchers at the U\niversity of Primorska】 】hav/e also【 \bee【n studying\ prope/rtie】s hidden in natural sustainable ma】terials, as for example\, Cann】abis sativa.Its】【 fibre\s are unde/【rgoing】 a r\enaissance withi【n the construc\tion sec/tor, because of t【h\eir /m/echanical properties"What is in】\teresting is th】e 】m/】echanical performance of i/ts fibres, whic\h\ are almost s\】imilar to】 glass fi\bres】," expla\ins 】Laetitia M】ar】rot, /a researcher, at the I\nno【renew CoE."The he/mp plant is/ also used as an i\nsulation】 material, allowing the house to breathe. The plant will /naturally absorb /m/oisture whe】n there is too much 】or it will re/lease it when t\here is not enough in the air."Pairing the construction s【ector with su/staina\b/l【e/ forestry management cou\ld gener/ate a whole slew of a【ddition/al 【economic, social,】 and environmental b\enefits.1212121/2121212/12J】ournalist n【ame • K】】at/y\ DartfordShare this article】Copy/p\as/te the art】icle video 】embed /link below/:CopySh/areTweetSha/res【endShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareS\hare/Shar【eSendShare】S/hareYou might also like 【【 \ \ Italian/ sc/ientists believe jell【yfish will soon be a brand new \del\ic\acy in Eur/ope 【 / / 【 【 】 】 /\ Latest cutting-edge tech\nolo/gy showcased at J】apan【 trade show 【 【 】 【 \ 【 Cementing the future: the EU's【 ECO\B\/INDER pr\oject 】takes a /hard【 look at concre【te 【 / / / / Mo】re aboutEnvironme【ntal prote【ctio/nNew technologiesResearchAgri/cul\tureArchitecture 】 【 M】ost viewed 【/ 【\ 】 】 】 】 Wha/t influence on climate i//s the coronavirus loc/kdown really having? \/ \ 【 The new AI system\ safeguarding pr\ema\tur\e babies fr\om infect】ion \ / 】 【 Messeng/er/ RNA: the molecule that may teac【【\h our b/\odies to beat cancer \ Appl/e【 and Goog【le say the】y'll work together to trace spr【ead of coronav\irus via smartpho】nes / 【 \ \ 】 】/ How EU funding is】\ chang【ing the face 】【\of Lat】vi\an innovation 【 / / Browse today's tagsTe/xt s】iz/e】AaAa】Just ye【s【t】erday it was annou\nced t\ha【t/ 170 global news \ou\tlets have signed up for th//e week-\】lon/g &lsquo/;Covering Cli】ma\te Now\&\rsq】uo; pledg】e, starting from】 16【th Septe】mber.In an attempt to boo\st the media’s coverage of the cl/imate crisis, \US-based /Columbia Journalism Rev【【iew (CJR) came up with the 'Cov\【ering Climate Now' init\】i/ative /back in M/a】y, alo\ngside /progressive m/aga【\zine The【【 Nation. Participatin】g outl【\ets are expe】cted to partake in a week dedicat【ed to spr】eading a\war【eness around the climate crisis, through repor【ti/ng 】on uniquely environm】ental iss】【ue/s.The pledge w\as announced following an 【article, co-written b】y t\】he【 respective /e/ditors o【f the two/ \publi】catio【ns, on the C】JR, entitled &ls/quo;The media are compla【】cent while the】 w/orld burns&r/squ\o;. A long re】ad at \【over 5,【000 words/, the detailed pi/ece addr【esses/ the【 &l【dquo】;climate silenc\【e】” that pervades the bulk of the news &ldquo\;when civili】zation is ac/celerating toward disas】ter.&】rdquo; View this po\st【 on Instagram/O/ver/ 170 n【ews outlets f\rom around 】the wo】rld 】have now signed up \f\or Co】vering Climate N\ow, a pr/\oj/\ect co-founded by CJR and The /Nation aimed at stren【g【thening】 the media’s focus on 】the climate crisi【s. 】Click the link in our bio t】o \learn about our proje\ct. #\c【limatechan/ge【 #oureart/hproject #organic #sustainability #e【co【 #earth #ecostyle #gogreen #nature】 #globalwarming #blue #mountain #be【autiful #【No】pollut】ion #】pico【ftheday #coveringclimatenow\A pos\t shared by Colum\bia Journalism R\e\view (@columbiajourn\a】lism\review) o【n Aug 28/,】 201【9 at/】 12:02pm PDTNow that th【e initiative h/as come into full 【f/【orce, 170 out\lets ha【ve jumped on the b】andw\【ago】n, agreeing t【o a week of ‘Co\v\er\ing Cli/mate \Now’. The coverage be\gins on 16th\ Sept\ember and will deliber【/ately coincide w\ith th/e United Nations Cli】mate Action S【ummit i】n N\ew York on 23rd Sep】tember/, whi】ch will culminate】 t】he week.【 】A【t the summit,【 global government【s will lay ou】】t exactly 【【how they plan 【to me/et the Par\is Agr\eement to combat climate change. The central】【 a/im of th\is agreement 【is to work together t\o /keep th/e 【global temperature “w\ell belo\w” 2 degree】s Ce\】lsius above pre-indust/ri\al levels.T/he 170 participa【nts ra】【nge from wire【 service】s to /newspapers, magazines,】 educationa】l institutions, \【】TV a\nd radi】o channels and even】 independent journalists. National public /【【TV broadc\asters in\ Italy, Sweden/ and the Un/】it】\ed States will be invo\【lved, as well as scholarly journa【/【ls such as the Harvard Business R【eview.Many of/ the outlets【/】 partak【】】i\ng ar【e\ g/lobally renowned, such as Bloomberg, CB】/S News\, The Guardian, \/Vice Media and Busi】ness】 Green,\ and incl/ude independen】t j/ou/【rnalists such as Benj\amin【 Ryan from The New York Times and Alex Thomson f\or 【Ch/annel 4 News.Mark Hertsgaard【, /a\uthor \and environment co】rrespondent f\or The Nation magaz\ine, \wh/o is helping to organize 'Cov【ering Climate Now',【 told Euronews Living about his inspiration be【hind 】starting the cam】paign.“I’ve/ been co/ver【ing climate change since 1/989, rep/orting from/ 25 countries/ around the【 world\/ a】n】d much /of】 the Un\ited\ States,\ and it 【has long be】en clear that most news outle/ts have underplayed 【if n/ot outright ignored the】 en【ormous imp】orta\n/ce of the climate story."H【ertsgaard went on to emphasise that the m/edia sector m】ust【 "tra【/nsform", citing the impetus for 'Covering /Climate/ No【w' as the UN /Inte\rgovern】mental Panel 】on Climate Cha】nge's landmark 1.5 C report last October/.I【s o\n/e week of environmental coverag\e enough?For many climate /change activis】ts, s】imply o】ne week of coverage may not \suffic】e, given the gr】ave /en【vironmental adversity we are facing a】s a \planet.Zio/n Lights, a national spo\kes【person for Extinction Rebe/llion UK, \【told \【Eu\ronews Living that 【the crisis we are 】facing is "bigger than any w\ar.""Although it's g】】ood t】o hear \that the】 media will be/ giv\ing this increased coverage to】】 the climate a】nd eco/logi】/c】al c【risis, it's still simply not enough to address t【he】 situation we ar【e in. It's importan】t that more journalists wa】【ke up to the realit】y of /this cris【is【, whi】ch 【req】uires f\ocused a/nd continuou【s reporting【, simil【ar】 to war time coverage since what we are facing 】is bi】gger than/ any war."Cli\mate chan【ge protestor【sSh\e co】nclu\ded by saying, "a week is nowhere /ne】【\ar enough time to tackle the crisis we a】re in."Morten】 Thysen, a【 Clim/ate Cam\paigner for Greenpe\ace U】K】, /also】 told Euronews Living that\ this is "good news, abo【ut very/ bad news."“Most of the 【news media has rigorousl\y】 ignored】 【th【/e climate crisis fo】r【 three\ decades, and so it’s encou】rag/ing that th【ese outlets are tryin【g a d/ifferent tac【/k. Hopef/ully this period of intensive coverage will \crea\te dee】per/ un\dersta【ndin\g /an【d engagement w【hic\h lasts longer than the week in questi\on.”Share t】his article 】 【【【 Mor】e from lifeWhen it【 comes to cleaning 【up 】the \Oceans, tec【hn/ology may be good b\ut education is even better

4.】While many citizens /across E/urope【 were celebrating Easter Monday,】 April /22 also marked】 Earth Da\y.【What 【is Earth Day?】Observed on 【the same date ev\ery 】ye】ar】,】 va【riou\s events are hel/d across the 【globe on Earth Day to d\emo【nstrate support for env】ironmental pr【otection.T\/he Ear】th Da\y Network now coordinates efforts【, worki【ng y/ear【-ro/und to 【solv/e clima【te chang/e, end plastic poll\ution, protect\ e\ndangered species, and enc【oura【】g】e the environment/al movement.Wh【en 】d【i【d】 it】 sta【rt?Peace activist John【 McConnell 【f\irst prop【o】se【d the idea of Earth Day /in 1969 at a 】UNESCO Con\ference in San F】rancisco.His goal was to //honour the Earth a】nd 】the co】nc【ept of peac【e on one day\ in the US, /which was【 first cele】brated on March 21, 19/70\ — 】t【he first day of spri/ng i/n the n【orthern he】/misphere.US Senator Gay】lo\rd Nels/on founded Ea【rth】 【Day one mont】h later on Apr【il 22/,\【 /1970, /after witnessi【】ng the rav/ages of the 1/969 mass】ive oil spill in San/ta Barbara, California.While it was【 o\riginally/ an】 Americ/an initiative, 】the concept was taken inter/n\ational in /1990,【 with events organized in 141 /co\untries.What events are h【/ap/pe【ning in Eu/ro【pe?Institu\tions 【across Eu】rope m/arked Ea【rth Day with va【rious ini【tia】】【\t\ives in 19\.The \Internat【iona】l Sc】hool of G】\en/eva in S【witzerland w/as set to /host a “green sale” and an organic food sale to raise money to/ plant trees on\ the school/ g】rounds.I\n Chisinau, Mol【/dova, the Gutta-Club — an or】ganisa】t【ion working mai/nly on educ\ation, energy, cli【mate and sust】ainable deve\lop【me【nt — host【ed a r【ange of Ear\th Da/y events including cle\an-u\p/ e【fforts in 30 villag【【es,】 a tree plant】【ing movement,【】 and the building of nesting boxe【s fo】r bir【ds.EC/O-】UNE\SCO in Dublin o\/rganised its annual/ ECO-Explorer C/amp for kids\ where child】ren 】aged 5-12 could 】explore the local urb【an 【ecology, take weather measurements, inves/tigate wildlife and d\iscover the city's g【reen spaces.W/【ha\t\ can I do?The U/nited Nat】ions published "T【he Lazy Person&r\sq】uo;s Gui】de/ to Saving\ the World", in which it lists actions people can take in line with \i【ts Sustainable Deve】】lopment Goals.The o【rganisation categorised the s\uggestions f【\rom 【lev【el 1 to le/vel 4, depending on whet】her the tasks were \at home, at work/ or i【n so】meone's local area.Here are s/ome\ suggest/ions f【r】om al\l four \levels:Save el\ectricity b【y pl\u【gging appl/iances into a power strip and turn】ing them off c/o】mpl】etely wh【en not in【 us\e, including your co【mputer.Stop 【pa】per \bank statem\ents and pay your bill/s onlin\e 】or via mobi】le【.Buy mini】mally packaged go\ods.】G/et a 】r\ug &mdash】; carpets 】and【 rugs keep your house 】warm and your the/r】m/ostat l【ow.Ta】ke short showers. B】\athtubs re/quire 【gallons more water than a 5-10 minute \shower.Com【posting\ food s【craps /can reduce climate/ impact 】while\ a/\lso recycling nutrients.【Let your hair and clothe/s d\ry natur】a/lly inste\ad of running a machine. If you do wa】sh your clothes, make sure t\he load is full.Eat l\ess meat, poultry, and fish. More re】sources are u\sed to pr】ovide meat than plants.Plan meals &mda/sh; use /sho\p/ping lists and av/oid imp/ulse\ buys. D【on&rsquo】;t succumb to marketin\g tricks\ th/at lead 【you t/o buy m\ore food t【h\an you need, p【art【icularly for perishable item【/s】.Bike【,\ wa\lk or take public t【ransport.】 Save the car tr】ips for when// you&rsq】uo;ve got a big group.Use a refillable water bottle an【d\/ /\【coffee cup.Share/ th】is articl\eShareTwee【\tSh】ares\endSh\are/Twee/\tSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShareSh【areSendShareSha【reYo】u might also li【ke 【 \ / / Ba【lance /'by disas【ter or design】9;: Why should we/ be worried by Earth Overshoot Day? 【| Euronews Answe【rs \ 】 \ 【 E/U&】#039;s youngest commission【e【】r on how to turn climate c【risis around 】 /】 / 【/ '【;Inc】redible win for nature': Plans\ \【to drill in G】reat Australian Bight abandon\ed \ More aboutEnvir】onm/ent】Environmental protectionEurope \ 】 Bro【wse today'\;s t/\ags。

M\apping /the 【Arctic\ sea lifeThe big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tags\Wildlife photography:“I】\t's not just about beautiful pictures”。再生资源

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